Monthly Archives: September 2017

Wasn’t terribly expensive; maybe 15 dollars for a bundle?

What type of rope is best for you? I have some recommendations above, under “What type of rope should I use? ”, but here are some qualtiies that will let you understand why I made those recommendations and let you better decide for yourself. “Natural Fiber” Ropes:. The combination of the lack of weight and the lack of friction means it’s going to slide a bit over skin. Your ties may not stay in exactly the same place as you put them, riding up or down, etc. It works well for bedroom bondage, but I wouldn’t put it under heavy load. Due to that same lack of friction as mentioned above, you can’t really use hitches or friction based means to lock off tension the way you can with natural fibre ropes of greater tooth. You can spend ages trying to unpick those things, which leads to swearing and frustration and a general lack of cool. The times when I’ve felt it most likely that I would need to use safety scissors to get someone out of rope, have all been times when I’ve been using this kind of cotton rope. Hemp never stood a chance, because jute got to me first – as far as rope goes, it’s my one true love. And tossa especially, because it’s highly durable with low maintenance.

To your right is a picture of braided cotton rope from one of the many 1-8 dollar shops in my city. It is by far the cheapest useful rope I’ve ever come across. You need to dry it under tension, or it will shrink and thicken unevenly. It’s not as fast as some synthetic ropes; because of the higher tooth, it will travel more slowly over skin and clothing. Above; undyed five mil tossa jute; below, 6 mil dyed tossa jute. It takes natural fibre dye surprisingly well, given the already existing golden colour.

Would definitely recommend. Tossa Jute. It has this really interesting feature; with the core removed, it actually sits quite flat on the skin, which is why I refer to it as webbing. This has multiple advantages; it spreads any pressure from the tie over a wider surface, and it doesn’t catch on things when you’re rolling around, struggling, what have you. When I last used it in a lesson, the model exclaimed over how nice it felt. Again, it comes in different colours. Hemp, Jute, Sisal, Cotton, Coconut. “Synthetic Fiber” Ropes:.

This has multiple advantages; it spreads any pressure from the tie over a wider surface, and it doesn’t catch on things when you’re rolling around, struggling, what have you. You need fewer wraps to get a safe distribution of pressure. Con: Poly pro or mixed material does not take color well or consistently. Con: Stretches in inconsistent/unpredictable ways. HOWEVER. The stuff I got from Twisted Monk is a very different story.

However, there are some advantages and improvements with this one which I will go over. Pros:. No. I’m not actually a dick like that. Bondage rope and what kind of rope is best for bondage? This is the kind of question I come across all the time on rope bondage groups and at beginners workshops. And the answer is, inevitably (drum-roll please):. Again, not recommended for shibari, but everything else goes, and I’ve heard that there are actually dyes which will change the colour of nylon. As I’ve only ever seen it in white, that means you should get a good result if you decide to go down that route. I wouldn’t bother with trying to get something to look particularly pretty or to do a complex tie. That said, for restraint, this will generally get the job done.